Faisal, Aleistar Crowley, and An Alarmingly Mischievious Sara.

(I always misspell that word! Sorry.)

Greets, Faisal, thanks for your thoughtful reply, and more so for not hating me for being less-than-supportive of the religion you were born into.

I’ll include your (somewhat edited) replies in italics, just in case you forgot what you said, uh, five minutes ago. Here goes..

Thing about Free Speech, to me, is this: You can do whatever you want with only your conscience to guide you. If your conscience is clear, alrighty then. Understandably, this doesn’t mean everyone will support or agree with your opinion, but Free Speech is ABSOLUTE. Same goes for Freedom of Religion. Finally (yeah, sorry for the length of this thing), I wish to mention two things:

Well.. not to bring up one of those hypothetical situations that makes people wonder if you’re actually 4-years-old under a twenty-something exterior, but.. what about insane people? Or sociopaths? Where should the line be drawn? I could kill my boss, frame my least favorite coworker for it, steal 12 women’s husbands (and their mistresses, for good measure) and walk off with the Hope Diamond and, theoretically, think nothing amiss.

Also, this ‘let your conscience be your guide’ philosophy is alarmingly reminiscent of Aleistar Crowley, a fake magician who said “Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law,” as well as the Wiccan Rede, which states “An it harm none, do as thou wilt.”

Well, I have news for you, I would LOVE to do what I wanted! You have no idea how much mischief I have left in my bones! But more on that in a sec.

1. I would be foolish to claim that my Islamic up-bringing would not make me more biased (or more likely to feel the urge to defend my official faith) towards Islam when it comes to discussions and arguments… though, er, “supernatural being” knows I try!

Hah, amusing, that last.. 🙂

2. I think that if you do “good things” (you figure out what they are) and don’t do “bad things” (you figure them out too) then you will, if such a place exists and I’m not going to think about it, go to a “good place”. If it turns out that the whole thing was a hoax, then at least you did good things in “life” on Earth.

Well, Faisal, that sounds lovely, only if everyone figures out their own “good things” and “bad things,” then we’re going to have a big fat problem on our hands, because human nature isn’t exactly angelic to begin with. Christianity aside, the nature of a human is to take what he can get, to seek his own.. er, I’ve forgotten the word in English. To seek masla7to ya3ni.

So the first problem with your second point–to my mind, anyhow–is that a subjective world will soon be a dead world, because nearly no-one will behave in the best interest of others, if he doesn’t have to. I know for a fact that I would be drinking, smoking, clubbing, going around with all sorts of men, getting revenge on my meaner-than-mean co-workers, lying to my heart’s content, not caring about those less fortunate than myself, yadda yadda. Maybe you aren’t as naughty as I am (in heart ya3ni) or maybe you think that my list of sins is more wussy than you care to mention, but whatever.

The second problem with point 2 is that, well, being as flawed as we are in nature, we can never expect God, the only Holy being anywhere, to be able to even look at us, as steeped in filth and sin as we are. (Always assuming you believe in God, but I seem to remember that you don’t, so let’s make it the generalizable “you”.) Point being, imperfect sinners need a bridge to God.

So, even if the whole thing was a hoax and we ended up being “good” on earth, this doesn’t mean we’re home free, because what if Christianity is true, and we DO need that bridge to God? (Meaning Jesus.) Even if we did “good” things (by anyone’s standards), we would still fall short of the glory of God, ‘miss the mark,’ as it were, and end up in hell.

Point being, if you REALLY and TRULY think that there’s nothing out there, then there should be nothing holding you back from truly doing whatever it is that you want to. And if you’re able to do those things, then you’re either a stronger and more courageous man than I (being unafraid of ‘what’s next,’ I mean), or my “I wish” list is more dorky than I gave it credit for.

Sorry for a long entry which probably didn’t add much in terms of substance.

Don’t say that, friend! These discussions are important, and I hope you’ll think about what I said inshallah. Can’t wait for the next round, and here’s hoping it’s twice as long as this reply was! Salaam and rabena ma3ak ya Faisal.. (and everyone else..)

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3 Responses to “Faisal, Aleistar Crowley, and An Alarmingly Mischievious Sara.”

  1. Dr. Sherif A. morgan Says:

    Dear Ms Ghorab,
    First I would like to thank you for your heartily effort in serving the Coptic Case through your distinguish published articles at the “New Egypt page”.
    As a representative of the Coptic united and responsible for the English page, It would be an honor and a great addition for our Web Page, if you accept to share in our effort to present to the whole world how the Copts are suffering, discriminated and rights less under Houssni Moubarak regime and his Islamic Wahabi government and rules, by publishing your special articles either in English language or Arabic language in our site.
    Thank you once again and we hope to receive your new article soon.
    God bless you
    My best regard
    Dr. Sherif A. Morgan
    Coptic United
    Switzerland

  2. Faisal Says:

    *Cough*

    Before I write my comment, I just wanted to say one thing: Islamic Wahabi government? Is Mr. Morgan using the exaggeration for effect?

    Either way, I’d started to write something yesterday and then (thinking I had posted it), I closed the window. This is good (3alashanik) because it was unbearably huge.

    So, let me see…

    I feel I need to take a couple of steps backwards in time and explain a couple of points that, perhaps, I did not explain properly:

    1. I am a strong believer that everyone has the right to do whatever they want to do without infringing on other’s rights. These seems logical to me and all encompassing. I follow this edict both in my political and social “ideology”.
    2. As an agnostic I believe that there might be a paranormal, supernatural, higher, larger, whatever-you-will entity that is a God. It’s just that I can’t prove it. I strongly dislike the concept of organized religion simply because of how easy it is to corrupt things like that. If word were, as is said, “etched in stone”, I would not have had a problem. But I believe that all the three heavenly religions have been tampered with along the centuries and millenia they have existed. This, to me, is unacceptable.
    3. I think that if someone is morally reponsible (what a weak and naive phrase to use, I know) then all would be good. Basically, don’t steal, kill, cheat on your wife, make promises you can’t keep, forge your documents, pay bribes, further someone’s suffering or cause them suffering to begin with etc etc etc and the world will definitely be better, if not perfect.
    4. Although I admit that one of my largest intellectual weaknesses is my belief in the relativism of everything (it’s a headache making choices and decisions, believe me), I strongly believe it’s true. I also believe that not all problems have solutions… merely possible steps which can mitigate their effects.
    5. I don’t get the idea of bridging and its necessity that you mention, could you explain further? Why do we need a bridge to God?
    6. The way I see it, and this is completely my viewpoint, people don’t naturally have to be evil or self-centered or even malicious or just “naughty”. There’s this and there’s that. I don’t like the idea of restriction upon restriction that were, in my personal viewpoint, made up over time or were used for a specific purpose only. I reiterate, I think all people who do good will go to heaven, if heaven exists. (If it doesn’t they’ve got nothing to lose). I think that whether you’re a Muslim, Christian, Jew, Pagan, Buddhist, Hindu, Tao-ist or even blog to L. Ron Hubbard’s Church of Friggin Scientology or whatever, and you do the good stuff (which are, in my opinion, quite obvious) then you’ll go to heaven.

    This is obviously not a practical “solution”. In fact, it’s the most impractical bullsh*t I’ve ever heard. But, I believe in it. It makes sense to me. So it’s impractical on a global scale… *shrug*.

    By the way, it would be a lot more difficult (again, in my opinion) for an atheist to “hold back” from doing some of the things that your religion and my official religion tell us not to… adultery for example. But some do it.

    So, it’s about Human willpower, the desire to be good. The will to help people. The strength to bring up your children this way and tell people about this (Excuse my pathetic attempt at using this comment to spread a little propaganda, with a helping of rainbows and sunshine, about what I believe).

    One last thing, I’m absolutely not relative about this at all. I also know that, on some levels, I’m taking the easy way out. It doesn’t come close to even scratching my conscience.

  3. Anonymous Says:

    *Cough*

    Before I write my comment, I just wanted to say one thing: Islamic Wahabi government? Is Mr. Morgan using the exaggeration for effect?

    Either way, I’d started to write something yesterday and then (thinking I had posted it), I closed the window. This is good (3alashanik) because it was unbearably huge.

    So, let me see…

    I feel I need to take a couple of steps backwards in time and explain a couple of points that, perhaps, I did not explain properly:

    1. I am a strong believer that everyone has the right to do whatever they want to do without infringing on other’s rights. These seems logical to me and all encompassing. I follow this edict both in my political and social “ideology”.
    2. As an agnostic I believe that there might be a paranormal, supernatural, higher, larger, whatever-you-will entity that is a God. It’s just that I can’t prove it. I strongly dislike the concept of organized religion simply because of how easy it is to corrupt things like that. If word were, as is said, “etched in stone”, I would not have had a problem. But I believe that all the three heavenly religions have been tampered with along the centuries and millenia they have existed. This, to me, is unacceptable.
    3. I think that if someone is morally reponsible (what a weak and naive phrase to use, I know) then all would be good. Basically, don’t steal, kill, cheat on your wife, make promises you can’t keep, forge your documents, pay bribes, further someone’s suffering or cause them suffering to begin with etc etc etc and the world will definitely be better, if not perfect.
    4. Although I admit that one of my largest intellectual weaknesses is my belief in the relativism of everything (it’s a headache making choices and decisions, believe me), I strongly believe it’s true. I also believe that not all problems have solutions… merely possible steps which can mitigate their effects.
    5. I don’t get the idea of bridging and its necessity that you mention, could you explain further? Why do we need a bridge to God?
    6. The way I see it, and this is completely my viewpoint, people don’t naturally have to be evil or self-centered or even malicious or just “naughty”. There’s this and there’s that. I don’t like the idea of restriction upon restriction that were, in my personal viewpoint, made up over time or were used for a specific purpose only. I reiterate, I think all people who do good will go to heaven, if heaven exists. (If it doesn’t they’ve got nothing to lose). I think that whether you’re a Muslim, Christian, Jew, Pagan, Buddhist, Hindu, Tao-ist or even blog to L. Ron Hubbard’s Church of Friggin Scientology or whatever, and you do the good stuff (which are, in my opinion, quite obvious) then you’ll go to heaven.

    This is obviously not a practical “solution”. In fact, it’s the most impractical bullsh*t I’ve ever heard. But, I believe in it. It makes sense to me. So it’s impractical on a global scale… *shrug*.

    By the way, it would be a lot more difficult (again, in my opinion) for an atheist to “hold back” from doing some of the things that your religion and my official religion tell us not to… adultery for example. But some do it.

    So, it’s about Human willpower, the desire to be good. The will to help people. The strength to bring up your children this way and tell people about this (Excuse my pathetic attempt at using this comment to spread a little propaganda, with a helping of rainbows and sunshine, about what I believe).

    One last thing, I’m absolutely not relative about this at all. I also know that, on some levels, I’m taking the easy way out. It doesn’t come close to even scratching my conscience.

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